Finally, some sense on drones

Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani KharEarlier this year, an American think tank published a study claiming that no civilians have been killed by drone strikes in 2012. Considering the difficulty in collecting information in areas affected by drone strikes and the tendency of militants to live among civilians, callously putting them in the direct line of fire, basic common sense says that claiming that absolutely no civilians have been killed is a hard claim to accept.

Another American study, published more recently, claims that drones are terrorising civilians. While it is certainly more believable that drones are terrifying for those living in affected areas, this report is also riddled with problems. Even though media claims that the report was written by ‘experts’, it was actually written by students. Most importantly, though, it was funded by an anti-drone organisation in the UK. This is rather like asking the CIA to fund a study on the effectiveness of drones – the conclusion is bought and paid for.

Obviously, that does not mean that people living in areas affected by militants and drone strikes are not terrorised. Actually, it would be surprising if they were not. They’re living in a war zone, and, while I’ve never personally found a headless body on the side of the road, I can imagine that it must be severely traumatising. That’s what is left out of the equation by those who seized on the latest ‘study’ to condemn drone strikes as ineffective – the responsibility of militant groups for causing the trauma in the first place, both by terrorising locals and by putting them in danger by hiding in their villages.

This has been the status of the drone debate since the past few years – you are expected to either wholly embrace drones and ignore any problems with them, or ignore reality and condemn them as weapons that only kill women and children.

Thankfully, a sensible position has finally been taken and, hopefully, an honest discussion can now be held about the controversial issue.

Speaking in New York, Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar said that “Pakistan does not disagree with what drones are trying to achieve by targeting terrorists but they remain unlawful”. This statement importantly acknowledges what the military has said in the past – most of those killed in drone attacks were militants.

General Officer Commanding 7-Division Maj-Gen Ghayur Mehmood said in a briefing here: “Myths and rumours about US predator strikes and the casualty figures are many, but it’s a reality that many of those being killed in these strikes are hardcore elements, a sizeable number of them foreigners.

“Yes there are a few civilian casualties in such precision strikes, but a majority of those eliminated are terrorists, including foreign terrorist elements.”

Importantly, however, the Foreign Minister’s statement also acknowledges that it is not realistic for one country to carry out unilateral attacks inside another country without creating resentment and possibly undermining the actual goal of the strikes.

While drones have killed a lot of militants, they have also given those same militants an effective propaganda tool not only against the US, but against our own government who gets accused of selling the nation’s sovereignty. This may be an unfair accusation, it is one that is too easy for militants to use and therefore cannot be ignored.

By cutting through the single-mindedness that dominates both sides of the drone debate, Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar has created an opening for solving the issue in a way that could maximise the effectiveness of the fight against militants while respecting what are real issues regarding sovereignty (as opposed to the phoney ghairat brigade kind). The details, wether they include technology transfers, PAF pilots, or some other cooperative measures are for officials of both nations to work out between themselves. For now, though, it’s good to know that at least there’s finally someone willing to have a rational conversation about a complex issue.

Zardari scores a sixer in New York

Pakistan shined in the international spotlight today. While our boys were scoring boundaries at Pallekele, President Zardari was hitting sixes at the UN General Assembly in New York City. His speech, delivered early this morning, presented an image of Pakistan as a global leader – one that seeks to bridge the cultural and political divides that agents provocateurs are actively trying to widen. Most importantly, he represented Pakistan on the world stage by directly answering misleading information and offering an authentic message from the Pakistani people.

President Zardari began his speech by getting straight to the heart of recent events and expressing the strongest condemnation of acts of incitement of hate against the faith of billions of Muslims of the world and our beloved prophet, Mohammad (PBUH).

Actually, President Zardari had already conveyed Pakistan’s concerns over the anti-Islam film that sparked protests around the world. But it was before the gathering of world leaders that the president made a difference. After registering Pakistan’s official protest and condemnation of the offensive act, President Zardari did not take a confrontational tone, but a tone of reconciliation.

Pakistan moves the United Nations to immediately address this alarming concern and bridge the widening rift to enable the comity of nations to be one again.

In this statement, President Zardari exemplified the mercy and forgiveness inherent to Islam. He did not condone the offensive act, and neither did he shrink from addressing it directly. But once the issue was addressed, he pointed to a path that could bring the world’s nations back together, defeating the wicked intentions of the filmmaker and the cynical opportunists who sought to profit from it.

While the offensive film has dominated headlines, it is hardly the only issue to be addressed. President Zardari addressed the plight of the Palestinians, the right of the people of Jammu & Kashmir to choose their own destiny. He spoke out about drone strikes and the sacrifices that Pakistan has made in the epic struggle against terrorism.

While doing so, President Zardari gave a full and unapologetic defence of Pakistan, decaring to the gathered world leaders, “I am not here to answer questions about Pakistan.”

The people of Pakistan have already answered them.

The politicians of Pakistan have answered them.

The soldiers of Pakistan have answered them.

We have lost over seven thousand Pakistani soldiers and policemen, and over 37,000 civilians.

We have lost our Minister for Minority Affairs, Shahbaz Bhatti and my friend Salmaan Taseer, the Governor of our most populous province of Punjab, to the mindset of extremism.

And I need not remind my friends here today, that I bear a personal scar.

On December 27, 2007 knowing her life was under threat from the mindset she had warned the world against, Pakistan’s first elected woman leader and my wife Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto was martyred through the bullets and bombs of terrorists.

Terrorism and extremism have destroyed human lives, torn social fabric, and devastated the economy.

Our economy, our lives, our ability to live in the shadow of our Sufi saints and our freedom-loving forefathers have been challenged.

We have responded.

Our soldiers have responded.

So I am not here to answer questions about Pakistan.

The room was stunned by such a powerful address, and many could not help but be reminded of the famous speech delivered by Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto in 1971 when President Zardari spoke these words:

To those who say we have not done enough, I say in all humility:

Please do not insult the memory of our dead, and the pain of our living.

Do not ask of my people, what no one has ever asked of any other peoples.

Do not demonize the innocent women, and children of Pakistan.

And please, stop this refrain to do more.

But here was the most amazing part of his speech. As the room filled with the most powerful men and women in the world was finally awoken from their slumber, President Zardari did not take the familiar path of defiance and isolation. He did not repeat George Bush’s mistake of isolating and alienating the nation by blaming and villanising others. Instead, once again, he showed the world that cooperation, connectivity, and mutual respect could find win-win solutions that ‘make us stakeholders in each other’s futures’.

In Pakistan, the lesson we learned, from the last thirty years, is that history cannot be changed.

But the future can — a future that is brighter, more prosperous and more secure, not only for Pakistanis, but for all people of the region, and indeed the world.

Standing before the entire United Nations, President Zardari was the leader showing the world the way to peace.

Transcript of President Zardari’s Speech before UN General Assembly

H.E.President Asif Ali Zardari
President of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan
General Debate 67th Session
United Nations General Assembly
September 25, 2012

 

Bismilla hirrahmaan irrahim –

Assalam-o-Alaikum — Peace be upon you.

Before I take up my speech, I want to express the strongest condemnation for the acts of incitement of hate against the faith of billions of Muslims of the world and our beloved prophet, Mohammad (Peace Be Upon Him).

Although we can never condone violence, the International community must not become silent observers and should criminalize such acts that destroy the peace of the world and endanger world security by misusing freedom of expression.

Pakistan moves the United Nations to immediately address this alarming concern and bridge the widening rift to enable the comity of nations to be one again.

Mr. President,

I want to congratulate you on your election to this important post.

I want to convey our appreciation of the previous President, His Excellency Nassir Abdulaziz Al Nasser, from our brotherly state of Qatar, who skillfully preceded you.

I would like to further express our appreciation for the laudable work of the honorable Secretary General Ban Ki Moon. We greatly appreciate his leadership in guiding the work of this organization.

It is a special privilege to be with you today, representing the brave and courageous people of Pakistan.

Globally, we face enormous challenges.

But with collective efforts and commitment we can provide a better future to our people.

We must work to end poverty.

We must work to protect the planet, and mitigate climate change.

We must ensure equal rights to all peoples, and protect the weak & vulnerable.

We must pursue justice and fairness for all people.

We must pursue the peaceful settlement of international disputes.

We must save our current and future generations from the horrors of war.

I think of my own three children and the generations of children yet unborn.

They, and all the children of the world, deserve safety, stability, and security.

These goals have guided me throughout my four years in office as President of Pakistan.

These are the goals and principles about which I want to talk to you today.

Mr. President,

Pakistan’s engagement with the United Nations lies at the heart of these goals.

We are proud of going above and beyond the call of duty in fulfilling our international responsibilities.

Pakistan has consistently been among the top UN peacekeeping troop contributors for many years.

Today, over 10,000 Pakistani troops proudly wear the UN Blue Helmets in the service of our brothers and sisters around the world.

Mr. President,

Our election to the Security Council reflects our commitment to world peace.

It is also a vote of confidence by the international community for Pakistan.

The UN represents our common aspirations for peace and development.

However, it needs reform.

The UN system must become more democratic and more accountable.

Reform should be based on consensus and democratic principles.

Mr. President,

In the last several years, Pakistan has repeatedly suffered from natural calamities.

The people of Pakistan appreciate the support of the United Nations and the international community.

Mr. President,

Being a democratic country, we believe that legitimate aspirations of any people should be accommodated peacefully.

And in a manner consistent with sovereignty, unity and territorial integrity.

We support the rights of the Palestinian people and an independent Palestinian State.

We also favor the admission of Palestine as a full member of the United Nations.

Mr. President,

There are a lot of questions that are asked of Pakistan these days.

I am not here to answer questions about Pakistan.

The people of Pakistan have already answered them.

The politicians of Pakistan have answered them.

The soldiers of Pakistan have answered them.

We have lost over seven thousand Pakistani soldiers and policemen, and over 37,000 civilians.

We have lost our Minister for Minority Affairs, Shahbaz Bhatti and my friend Salmaan Taseer, the Governor of our most populous province of Punjab, to the mindset of extremism.

And I need not remind my friends here today, that I bear a personal scar.

On December 27, 2007 knowing her life was under threat from the mindset she had warned the world against, Pakistan’s first elected woman leader and my wife Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto was martyred through the bullets and bombs of terrorists.

Terrorism and extremism have destroyed human lives, torn social fabric, and devastated the economy.

Our economy, our lives, our ability to live in the shadow of our Sufi saints and our freedom-loving forefathers have been challenged.

We have responded.

Our soldiers have responded.

So I am not here to answer questions about Pakistan.

I am here to ask some questions on behalf of my people.

On behalf of the two year old baby who was killed in the bombing at Lahore’s Moon Market on December 7, 2009.

On behalf of Pervaiz Masih, a Christian Pakistani, who was killed with six others, trying to protect Muslim Pakistanis during a bomb attack on the Islamic University in Islamabad on October 20, 2009.

On behalf of Mr. GHA-YOOR, the Commandant of the Frontier Constabulary police force in Peshawar, who was martyred by militants on August 4, 2010.

On behalf of the traders and businessmen in Peshawar, Quetta, Lahore and Karachi, of the dozens of marketplaces that have been ravaged by multiple bombings. Over and over and over again.

And perhaps most of all, on behalf of my three children, whose mother Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto was also martyred by terrorists.

Mr. President,

For more than thirty years, our doors have been open to my Afghan brothers and sisters.

For many years, we were left to fend for ourselves and our Afghan guests.

Mr. President,

I remember the red carpet that was rolled out for all the dictators in our country – dictators who promised the international community the moon – while Pakistan was kept in the dark.

These dictators and their regimes are responsible for suffocating and throttling Pakistan, Pakistan’s institutions, and Pakistani democracy.

I remember the judicial execution of Pakistan’s first elected leader, Shaheed Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto.

I remember the jailing of Pakistan’s elected leaders.

I remember the twelve years I, myself spent in prison.

And I remember the billions provided by the international community to support those dictatorships.

My country’s social fabric, its very character has been altered.

Our condition today is a product of dictatorships.

Mr. President,

No country and no people have suffered more in the epic struggle against terrorism, than Pakistan.

Drone strikes and civilian casualties on our territory add to the complexity of our battle for hearts and minds through this epic struggle.

To those who say we have not done enough, I say in all humility:

Please do not insult the memory of our dead, and the pain of our living.

Do not ask of my people, what no one has ever asked of any other peoples.

Do not demonize the innocent women, and children of Pakistan.

And please, stop this refrain to do more.

The simplest question of all is:

How much more suffering can Pakistan endure?

Mr. President,

I am sure the international community does not want any suffering anywhere, least of all in Pakistan.

We believe in fact, that the international community is a partner.

This is because it is the common interest of all nations to work together.

In Pakistan, I have helped bring about a major strategic shift in how we view working together.

Within Pakistan, our democracy has brought about major changes.

InshaAllah, this will be the first civilian government in Pakistan’s sixty-six year history to complete its full, five year term.

In this time, Parliament has passed unprecedented reforms.

We have restored the consensus 1973 Constitution.

The National Assembly has enacted wide ranging social reforms.

We have established a National Commission on Women and a National Commission on Human Rights.

We have established for the very first time a truly Independent Election Commission, to ensure free, fair and transparent elections.

Our media is free, uncensored and thriving.

Our civil society is flourishing under the protection of democracy.

We have created the first social safety net through the women of Pakistan for the weak and less privileged. Millions of families have benefitted.

We have aided the poor and at the same time empowered the women of our households.

This safety net is called the Benazir Income Support Program.

These are the gifts of democracy.

This is the dream of Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto.

Mr. President,

The growing regional pivot in Pakistan’s foreign policy is a reflection of our democratic policy-making.

In engaging with our region, we are changing the future.

In China our strategic partnership is growing from strength to strength.

In Afghanistan, we have begun to engage and deepen our friendship with the entire range of the Afghan political spectrum.

We believe that a sovereign, stable and secure Afghanistan is good for the Afghan people.

And what is good for the Afghan people is good for Pakistan.

While our hearts and homes remain open to our Afghan brothers, it is imperative that the international community support the three million Afghan refugees in Pakistan in their quest to return home with dignity.

A brighter Afghan future will only be possible when the search for peace is Afghan-owned, Afghan-driven and Afghan-led.

We respect and support the efforts of the Government of Afghanistan for reconciliation and peace.

Pakistan will support in every way possible, any process that reflects Afghan national consensus.

Similarly, we approach our relations with India on mutual trust.

The contacts between our leadership are expanding.

I was encouraged by my discussions with the Prime Minister of India last month in Tehran, who I met for the fifth time in four years.

Mr. President,

Our principled position on territorial disputes remains a bedrock of our foreign policy.

We will continue to support the right of the people of Jammu & Kashmir to peacefully choose their destiny in accordance with the UN Security Council’s long-standing resolutions on this matter.

Kashmir remains a symbol of the failures, rather than strengths of the UN system.

We feel that resolution of these issues can only be arrived in an environment of cooperation.

By normalizing trade relations we want to create a regional South Asian narrative.

This narrative will provide an environment that will mutually benefit the countries of our region.

Mr. President,

Along this road, there are pitfalls.

One of them is the tendency to respond to failure through blame.

Pakistan does not blame others for the challenges it faces.

We believe we should look for win-win solutions.

Regional cooperation and connectivity will bring us closer and bind us together.

It will make us stakeholders in each other’s futures.

Our hosting of a quadrilateral summit next month and our signing of the Afghan Pakistan Transit Trade Agreement

are proof of this commitment to regional connectivity.

In Pakistan, the lesson we learned, from the last thirty years, is that history cannot be changed.

But the future can — a future that is brighter, more prosperous and more secure,

not only for Pakistanis, but for all people of the region, and indeed the world.
Mr. President:

I must thank the member states of the European Union for recognizing the value of trade to Pakistan.

We seek trade, rather than aid.

By granting trade concession to Pakistan, the EU has sent a positive message.

The trade concessions will help us revive the economy and fight terrorism.

Mr. President,

As we embark on this ambitious transformative experience, we are aware that there are threats and pitfalls.

One of them is the spread and illegal trade of heroin.

Despite the presence of international forces in Afghanistan, the size of the heroin trade has increased by 3000% in the last decade.

The heroin industry is eroding the social fabric of our societies.

Terrorist activities within our region and indeed all over the world are funded and fueled by the unrestricted production and sale of illegal drugs.

Pakistan has pursued an ambitious agenda to control this menace.

We are coordinating with our neighbors and will hold a conference later this year to develop a unified approach to stamping out this drug trade.

I call upon this august body, and especially those nations represented here who are actively engaged in the region.

In this great hall of international collective action, let us begin this process —

here, today, together.

Mr. President, Excellencies, delegates, fellow citizens of the world:

I have committed my Presidency and my nation’s future to a paradigm shift.

A permanent democratic future for Pakistan.

It has not been easy.

But nothing worth fighting for is easy.

We long ago stopped thinking of doing what is easy.

Instead, we have committed ourselves to doing what is right.

In that regard, I recall the powerful words of my beloved martyred wife and my leader Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto when she appeared before this august body sixteen years ago.

Her words ring out and can guide us into a new future.

She said in 1996:

“I dream of a third millennium in which the gap between rich and poor evaporates;

in which illiteracy, hunger, malnutrition and disease are at last conquered;

I dream of a third millennium in which every child is planned, wanted, nurtured and supported;

and in which the birth of a girl is welcomed with the same joy as that of a boy.

I dream of a millennium of tolerance and pluralism,
in which people respect other people, nations respect other nations,
and religions respect other religions.

That is the third millennium I see for my country and all of yours.”

We have made some progress towards achieving these goals.

But so much remains to be done.

In her memory and in the name of God Almighty, Pakistan commits to that path again today.

Thank you ladies and gentlemen, and may peace be upon you, and your countries, and the people of your countries.

Pakistan Zindabad.

Swiss Letter a Test of SC’s Motives

On Tuesday, Federal Law Minister Farooq H. Naek presented a draft of the Swiss letter in the Supreme Court. With this, the government has passed the test put to it by the Supreme Court and disproven claims that the government is in defiance of the judiciary. The next test, then, is put to the Supreme Court to determine whether they are, as they have repeatedly claimed, merely following the rule of law, or if they are carrying out an orchestrated attack against the democratically elected president.

It should be recalled that Justice Asif Saeed Khan Khosa laid out four clear steps for the PM to take to demonstrate a good faith effort to comply with the Supreme Court’s directive:

Justice Asif Saeed Khan Khosa, while appreciating the stance of the prime minister, had told him that they would have to adopt four steps onwards for implementation of its directive. Firstly, the authorisation which should be produced in writing; secondly, draft of the letter to meet the directives contained in para 178 and upto the satisfaction of the court; thirdly, dispatch to and receipt by the concerned Swiss and other authorities; and fourthly, confirmation of such communication. Justice Khosa assured the PM that the bench would address Federation’s concerns and would not go beyond what they had written in para 178.

It appears that the government is prepared to take each of these four steps. Though the draft has not been made public, it is assumed that the letter requests the Swiss authorities to understand that the letter previously written by former AG Malik Qayyum is null and void. It is also believed that the government’s draft includes a notification of the president’s immunity under Article 248 of the Constitution. This has also been recognised by Justice Khosa, who recently stated that the Supreme Court accepts that the president enjoys immunity:

“We don’t deny about the immunity and we are ready to give any help by even stating in our order that Zardari is the president and has the immunity. God willing nothing will happen and democracy will not be derailed,” Justice Khosa said, adding that the world would watch that both the institutions would be vindicated.

So even if the letter includes a recognition of the president’s immunity under the constitution, the Supreme Court itself has previously directed that this would satisfy the Court’s order. To change their direction now and not accept the government’s draft would suggest that fears of judicial activism turning into political activism had come true, and what was being carried out was never about ‘rule of law’ but a political agenda.

On the other hand, the Supreme Court now has in its power the ability to clear the air between the judiciary and the executive and realise Justice Khosa’s hope that “both the institutions would be vindicated”. Let us hope that this episode finally comes to a quiet close so that both institutions can move on to addressing the grave issues facing the nation instead of obsessing over the past.

PPP’s Losing Strategy

PPP Supporters Protest Blasphemy

A famous quotation attributed to the British political philosopher Edmund Burke says that “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing”. That may be the least that is necessary, but it’s not the only path. Evil can also triumph when good men undermine their own cause by taking a page out of evil’s playbook. Unfortunately, that seems to be happening among some in PPP, and it’s a losing strategy.

As elections draw near, politics naturally takes a turn for the worst. Disgust at the now well-known YouTube video was justified, but the hijacking of the people’s sentiments by religious parties and banned groups was not. By calling for a national holiday, PPP’s strategy to limit these group’s ability to exploit the situation was not only too clever by half, it actually played into the hands of extremist groups.

While most people have focused on the holiday’s giving legitimacy to the demonstrations, what has been largely overlooked is that the national holiday gave extremist groups cover to carry out violent attacks. By nightfall on Friday, groups like Jamaat-e-Islami and Jamaat-ud-Dawa took to the media to proclaim that any acts of violence were not carried out by their organisations who protested peacefully. As proof, they dared anyone to provide evidence of JI or JuD supporters doing such acts while they provided photos and videos of their supporters waving flags and chanting peacefully.

Of course this is a classic smoke and mirrors operation. All these groups had to do is make sure to document their supporters with flags acting peacefully, while their supporters without flags created mayhem. With the entire nation on holiday, it would be impossible to sort out who is who. Before you think this is going a step too far, keep in mind that we’re talking about groups that claim they don’t engage in violence and believe they’re telling the truth because they have redefined violence.

Unfortunately, some PPP leaders didn’t stop with the passive strategy of declaring the national holiday that gave cover to the extremists, they started parroting them themselves in order to appeal to the national mood.

Headlines reporting Rehman Malik’s telling the West to stop supporting Pakistan’s enemies sounded more like a speech at a DPC rally than the statements of a Federal Minister. Of course, this isn’t the first time that Rehman Malik has ventured off of his script in an attempt to appease the right wing – the worst episode being when he threatened to kill blasphemers with his own hands following the murder of one of his own party leaders by a crazed lunatic.

Then there’s Ghulam Ahmed Bilour who sounded more like Mullah Yousaf Qureshi than a Federal Minister when he announced a bounty of $100,000 for murder of the maker of the offensive video. Granted Bilour is ANP and not PPP, but as the leader of a coalition government, the PPP must take responsibility for his presence in the Cabinet.

That these statements and the national holiday are poorly thought out should be obvious. Not only do they undermine the PPP’s position as a modern, progressive political party, they also gain nothing. Let’s face reality – no matter how much support PPP leaders give for right-wing issues, they will never be enough to win the support of the right-wing.

Munawar Hasan and Hafiz Saeed attack the PPP as irreligious not because they want PPP to accept their positions. They do it because they have nothing to offer the people and therefore have to rely on attacks. Giving in to their demands will not neutralise their attacks, it will only make their demands more extreme. Today it is protests against an internet video clip, tomorrow its funding for jihad…then what? Continue down this path for very long and at a certain point, the PPP becomes completely irrelevant.

And this brings us to the point. If the PPP leadership does not have the courage of conviction to sack Federal Ministers who cross the line to openly advocate murder, on what moral authority are they asking for our support?

The PPP became the most popular political party across the nation not because it campaigned on religious symbols, but because it campaigned on the substance of our religion. What is ‘Roti, Kapra aur Makan’ if not the command of almighty Allah to care for the poor of society? Just as Islam was spread across the region not at the tip of a sword but by the demonstration of tolerance and love that was shown by earlier Muslims, the PPP’s popularity was gained not through threats and intimidation but by fighting for the rights of the country’s poorest and least powerful.

Bilawal’s passionate speech on the martyrdom of Salmaan Taseer Shaheed exemplified the type of courageous and inspirational leadership that the people are desperate for – one that stands up for justice without fear, not when it is toeing the popular line, but when it stands out. In this, he has reminded the people of his mother who never pretended to be an extremist to gain popular support, but rather watered the roots of tolerance and democracy with her own life’s blood.

We have seen this courage in other recent PPP leaders, also: Salmaan Taseer Shaheed, Shahbaz Bhatti Shaheed, Sherry Rehman, Farahnaz Ispahani. We have heard it in the statements of Ahmad Mukhtar and Nadeem Afzal Chan, both of them unwavering in speaking out against the sectarianism that is ripping our nation apart at the seams. This should be the public face of what is supposed to be the nation’s largest liberal party, not appeasement and parroting.

There is another, less popular quotation from Mr Edmund Burke that bears remembering as well: “I take toleration to be a part of religion. I do not know which I would sacrifice; I would keep them both: it is not necessary that I should sacrifice either.” The PPP does not need to sacrifice tolerance to align itself with the religion of the masses, it only needs to faithfully stick to its founding principles. Doing otherwise is a losing strategy.