Are we living up to the promise of the Lahore Resolution?

Lahore SessionAs we all ignore the obvious neo-colonialist overtones of foreign troops parading through the capital on Pakistan Day, I want to draw our attention back away from the militarism that has come to dominate our entire national narrative to the actual words of the Lahore Resolution.

We are all aware of the key component which called for “territorial readjustments as may be necessary that the areas in which the Muslims are numerically in a majority”. But do any of us remember the promise that we made along with this demand?

That adequate, effective and mandatory safeguards should be specifically provided in the constitution for minorities in these units in the regions for the protection of their religious, cultural, economic, political, administrative and other rights and interests in consultations with them and in other parts of India where the Mussalmans are in a majority adequate, effective and mandatory safeguards shall be specifically provided in constitution for them and other minorities for the protection of their religious, cultural, economic, political, administrative and other rights and interests in consultation with them.

In 1947, almost 23 percent of Pakistan’s population were non-Muslim citizens. Today, the proportion of non-Muslims has declined to approximately 3 percent. Instead of constitutional protections for religious minorities, we have created constitutional persecution.

Instead of celebrating missile technology and Chinese funds, we should reflect on the vision laid out in the Lahore Resolution, and ask ourselves honestly: Have we lived up to its promises?